Education and business – the right mix?

A fantastic talk from Dan Pink about what motivates workers and illustrates how important it is to get the balance of monetary value and work right. This is particularly relevant with education being run as a business as the two rarely compliment each other and in many respects are detrimental to teaching and learning.

Another interesting aspect of this talk is the suggestion that praise and punishment are key motivators to elicit desired behaviour; it’s not as clear cut as it seems, particularly in a classroom setting.

Enjoy the video and let me know what you think.

Tagged , , , ,

How could teaching become the foremost career in England?

A thought provoking piece considering how to raise the status of the teaching profession in the UK. It’s interesting that research indicates the public trust teachers almost unequivocally yet this does not reflect in practice where teachers appear to be demonised particularly through the media.

via How could teaching become the foremost career in England?.

Tagged ,

Why do so many teachers leave teaching?

Why do so many teachers leave teaching?.

An interesting piece from David Didau at the Learning Spy who contemplates the reasons why teachers leave teaching within the first five years of entering the profession.

As there is no hard evidence of exactly why they do leave in droves it would be an interesting piece to research for all you action researchers out there. Are there links to the de-professionalism of the role which acts as a demotivator and a route for escape or are teachers not adequately prepared for the role during their training and find the reality very different?

Let me know why you think teachers leave the profession, I’d be interested to hear.

Tagged , ,

Teachers or media damaging the profession?

Romany Blythe


I’d be interested to hear your opinions regarding teachers being involved in public displays to support membership of groups/parties.  There are several questions to consider regarding personal and professional life such as, is a teacher’s life private out of work or are the lines blurred when it comes to belonging to what the media and public may consider ‘undesirable groups’.  Under The Human Rights Act it is not unlawful to support or follow organisations unless it is causing distress or upset to others therefore where is the line drawn between highly individualised responses to public demonstration of support for groups/parties.

As a teacher myself I am often asked by students what I do outside of work as the public have perceptions of what a teacher should be doing which is very different to what we do away from work.  It would appear that the media seem to target particular professionals during reportage when there are a wide cross section of indviduals involved.

Let me know what you think, are the media damaging the teaching profession through biased reportage or are they providing an insight into the diverse membership of activist groups.

For more on this story see:

Tagged , , ,

Welcome to the debate

There’s so much in the news recently to encourage lively debate on education.  I look forward to hearing your levelled opinions on posts and I will be posting regularly on current educational issues and trends.